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3031 Stanton St.
Springfield, IL 62703
217/585-5808
 
Internet Safety Curriculum - Eleventh Grade
Internet Safety DomainsISTE Digital Citizenship StandardEleventh GradeWebsiteHandout

(1) Safe and responsible use of social networking websites, chat rooms, electronic mail, bulletin boards, instant messaging, and other means of communication on the internet

(2a) Cultivate and manage their digital identity and reputation and are aware of the performance of their actions in the digital world.

Clean up your digital identity. This article, written by students, offer helpful, cautionary information.

http://bhshelpdesk.com/2013/01/15/cleaning-up-your-digital-identity-a-students-perspective/

(2) Recognizing, avoiding, and reporting online solicitations of students, their classmates, and their friends by sexual predators

(2b) Engage in positive, safe, legal and ethical behavior when using technology, including social interactions online or when using networked devices.

Students explore the risks and responsibilities of carrying out romantic relationships in the digital world. They watch the video Overexposed about a girl who sent a “sext” message to her boyfriend, which he then shared with others. After discussing the video, students create an ending to a story about a girl who is pressured to “sext.” They brainstorm ways to avoid sexting and to use digital technologies responsibly in romantic relationships. Additionally, students can check out the Tips to Prevent Sexting for Teens tip sheet.

https://www.commonsensemedia.org/educators/lesson/overexposed-sexting-and-relationships
http://cdn.netsmartz.org/tipsheets/sexting_teens.pdf

(3) Risks of transmitting personal information on the Internet

(2d) Manage their personal data to maintain digital privacy and security and are aware of data-collection technology used to track their navigation online.

Think Before You Post
Webcam sessions and photos can be captured, and users can circulate those images online. In some cases people believed they were interacting with trusted friends but found their images were distributed to others or posted on web sites. Read the article and discuss situations that should be reported.

https://www.commonsensemedia.org/videos/oversharing-think-before-you-post

(4) Recognizing and avoiding unsolicited or deceptive communications received online.

(2d) Manage their personal data to maintain digital privacy and security and are aware of data-collection technology used to track their navigation online.

Students take the Phishing and Spam IQ Quiz online to see if they know how to tell real email messages from phishing messages.

http://www.sonicwall.com/phishing/

(5) Recognizing and reporting online harassment and cyber-bullying.

(2b) Engage in positive, safe, legal and ethical behavior when using technology, including social interactions online or when using networked devices.

Taking Perspectives on Cyberbullying Students learn about the dynamics of online cruelty and how it affects all of the people involved. They begin by exploring a scenario from the TV show Friday Night Lights, in which a teen girl creates a hate website about another girl. Students take the perspective of different characters and brainstorm alternative decisions each character could have made. Finally, students discuss what actions they can take when they encounter online cruelty in their own lives, including how to be an upstander. (Note: The term “online cruelty” encompasses what is often referred to as “cyberbullying,” but it covers a broader range of behaviors and may speak more effectively to teens than the term cyberbullying. We use the term “online cruelty” throughout this lesson.)

https://www.commonsensemedia.org/educators/lesson/taking-perspectives-cyberbullying-11-12
https://www.commonsense.org/education/system/files/uploads/classroom-curriculum/9-12-unit3-takingperspectivesoncyberbullying.pdf?x=1